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Daily Schedule & Assignments

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Updated: Nov. 1, 2017

2018 Institute Daily Schedule and Readings

Sunday, July 8 – Exploring the Key Constitutional Issues of Slavery

​4:30-5:30 p.m.
Registration/Capitol Hill Hotel Lobby
​7-8:30 p.m.
​Introduction/Institute Overview/Keynote Presentation
Capitol Hill Hotel’s Parlor Room will be the site for an address by Paul Finkelman, professor of law, University of Pittsburgh School of Law, who will give an overview of the key issues on slavery and the Constitution. 
​Sunday’s Reading:
Paul Finkelman’s Supreme Injustice: Slavery in the Nation’s Highest Court will be provided to all participants. 

Monday, July 9 – Slavery and the Constitution
9-10:15 a.m.
Dr. Finkelman’s seminar is continued with a discussion on the impact of slavery on the Constitution.
​10:15-10:30 a.m.
Break
​10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
​Dr. Finkelman will answer questions about slavery under the Constitution.
​12-1:30 p.m.
​Lunch on your own
​1:30-2:45 p.m.
​Orientation tour of the Library of Congress’ vast holdings
​2:45-3 p.m.
​Break
​3-4:15 p.m.
​Participants will register for and receive a Library of Congress Research Card.
​4:15-5 p.m.
​Follow procedure for checking out books at the Library of Congress.
​6:30-9 p.m.
​Washington City and Slavery – Evening Tour Part 1. This guided field study (using the Metro), will orient participants to sites in Washington, D.C., related to slavery and abolition with Institute Director Paul Benson.
Monday’s Reading: 
Selections from David Waldstreicher’s Slavery's Constitution: From Revolution to Ratification in the Slavery & Constitution Reader [Chapter 2 “The Great Compromises of the Constitutional Convention 57-106; Chapter 3 “Protesting & Ratifying Slavery’s Constitution” 107-152]

Tuesday, July 10 – Antislavery and the Constitution
9-10:15 a.m.
Seymour Drescher, distinguished university professor emeritus, 
will open a discussion on the evolution of abolitionism in America with a comparative perspective.
​10:15-10:30 a.m.
Break
​10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
​Dr. Drescher will continue discussion on the political ramifications of abolition.
​12-1:30 p.m.
​Lunch on your own
​1:30-2:45 p.m.
​Seymour Drescher will answer questions about his morning presentations.
​2:45-3 p.m.
​Break
​3 p.m.
​Departure for Frederick Douglass National Historic Site
3:30-4:30 p.m.
​Presentation on life and times of abolitionist Frederick Douglass by Douglass Home Staff
​4:30-5:30 p.m.
​Douglass home tour
​6:30-9 p.m.
​Participants may also do research at the Library of Congress using the Second Street, SE, Entrance for Researchers.
​Tuesday’s Reading: 
Selections from Seymour Drescher’s Abolition in the Slavery & Constitution Reader
[Chapter 1 “A Perennial Institution” 3-25 and Chapter 5 “Age of the American 
Revolution” 115-145] 

Wednesday, July 11 – Researching in the Library of Congress
9-10:15 a.m.
Jeffrey Flannery, director of the Library of Congress’ Manuscripts Room, and Lewis Wyman will speak about the most effective ways to find slavery and abolition papers in the Library of Congress or through the Library of Congress’ online resources. Meet just outside the James Madison’s Building’s Room LM102.
​10:15-10:30 a.m.
Break
​10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
​Flannery and Lewis will help participants start their research projects.
​12-1:30 p.m.
​Lunch on your own
​1:30-2:45 p.m.
Sybil Moses, reference specialist in African-American history and culture at the Library of Congress, will help participants discover the best way to do research in slavery studies.
​2:45-3 p.m.
​Break
​3-5 p.m.
​Independent research in the Library of Congress
​6:30-9 p.m.
Washington City and Slavery Evening Tour Part 2 
​Wednesday’s Reading:
Selections from David Davis’ Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World in the Slavery & Constitution Reader [Chapter 6 “Slavery in Colonial North America,” 124-140; Chapter 7 “The Problem of Slavery in the American Revolution,” 141-156; Chapter 9 “Slavery in the 19th Century South I,” 175-192; and Chapter 10 “Slavery in the 19th Century South II,” 193-204]

Thursday, July 12 – Slavery and Politics
9-10:15 a.m.
Lacy Ford, professor of history at the University of South Carolina, will lead a discussion examining the question of how slavery came to dominate American politics and Southern culture.
​10:15-10:30 a.m.
Break
​10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
​Dr. Ford will continue this discussion and focus on the Southern perspective relative to slavery.
​12-1:30 p.m.
​Lunch on your own
​1:30-2:45 p.m.
​Lacy Ford will answer questions about his morning presentations.
​2:45-3 p.m.
​Break
​3-5 p.m.
​Supreme Court historian Ben Gold will present a field study on the   Supreme Court to illuminate some of the significant issues of slavery and the Constitution in Supreme Court cases.
​6:30-9 p.m.
​Participants may also do research at the Library of Congress using the Second Street, SE, Entrance for Researchers. 
Thursday’s Reading: 
Selections from Lacy Ford’s Deliver Us From Evil: The Slavery Question in the Old South in the Slavery & Constitution Reader [Chapter 1 “Owning Slaves, Disowning Slavery,” 19-48; Chapter 3 “Extending Slavery,” 112-142; Chapter 11 “Rumors and Insurrections,” 329-360; Chapter 16 “Abolition Poison and Southern Antidotes,” 481-509; and Chapter 17 “Ideological Reconfiguration of Slavery in the Lower South,” 505-534]

Friday, July 13 – Slavery and Business
9-10:15 a.m.
Jenny Bourne, professor of incentive economics, Carleton College, will lead a discussion exploring the economics of American slavery.
​10:15-10:30 a.m.
Break
​10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
​Dr. Bourne will further encourage discussion on the business of slavery.
​12-1:30 p.m.
​Lunch on your own
​1:30-2:45 p.m.
​Bourne will answer questions about her presentation.
​3-5 p.m.
​Research time in the Library of Congress
Friday’s Reading:
Selections from Jenny Bourne’s The Bondsman's Burden: An Economic Analysis of the Common Law of Southern Slavery in the Slavery & Constitution Reader [Chapter 6 “Defining A Citizen” 181-208; Chapter 7 ”Suborning Chaos” 209-242; and Chapter 8 “Imposing Order” 243-270]

Saturday, July 14 – Second Research Day
8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.
Participants will have the entire day for slavery and abolition research in the Library of Congress. The library is open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Sunday, July 15 – Free Day in Washington, D.C.

Monday, July 16 – The Underground Railroad and the Constitution
9-10:15 a.m.
Eric Foner, DeWitt Clinton professor of history at Columbia University, will open a discussion on the question of the Underground Railroad and the constitutional issues that it raised.
​10:15-10:30 a.m.
Break
​10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
​Dr. Foner will encourage discussion on a variety of constitutional issues related to the Underground Railroad.
​12-1:30 p.m.
​Lunch on your own
​1:30-2:45 p.m.
​Dr. Foner will answer questions about his presentation.
3-5 p.m.
​Research time in the Library of Congress
​6:30-9 p.m.
​Participants may also do research at the Library of Congress using the Second Street, SE, Entrance for Researchers.
Monday’s Reading: 
Selections from Eric Foner’s Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad in the Slavery & Constitution Reader [Chapter 3 “Origins of the Underground Railroad,”63-90; Chapter 5 “The Fugitive Slave law and the Crisis in the Black Community,”119-150; and Chapter 7 “The Record of Fugitives: An Account of Runaway Slaves in the 1850s” 190-215]

Tuesday, July 17 – Third Research Day
9-10:15 a.m.
Jeffrey Flannery, director of the Library of Congress’ Manuscripts Room, and Lewis Wyman will continue helping participants on their research projects.
​10:15-10:30 a.m.
Break
​10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
​Flannery and Lewis will continue to help participants with their research projects.
​12-1:30 p.m.
​Lunch on your own
​1:30-2:45 p.m.
Mark Dimunation, chief of the Rare Books Division at the Library of Congress, will speak about materials available on slavery and abolition in the Library of Congress’ Rare Books Collection.
​2:45-3 p.m.
​Break
​3-5 p.m.
​Independent research in the Library of Congress
​6:30-9 p.m.
​Participants may do research at the Library of Congress using the Second Street, SE, Entrance for Researchers.
​Tuesday’s Reading:
Selections from George William Van Cleve’s A Slaveholders' Union: Slavery, Politics, and the Constitution in the Early American Republic in the Slavery & Constitution Reader [Part 2 “The Making of the Slaveholders Constitution” 103-186; Part 3 “Slavery in the New Nation” 187-258]

Wednesday, July 18 – Abolition and Emancipation
9-10:15 a.m.
Kate Masur, associate professor of history at Northwestern University, will start a discussion on the evolution of emancipation in the years before the Civil War.
​10:15-10:30 a.m.
Break
​10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
​Dr. Masur will continue the discussion on the political ramifications of emancipation.
​12-1:30 p.m.
​Lunch on your own
​1:30-2:45 p.m.
​Dr. Masur will answer questions about her morning presentations.
​2:45-3 p.m.
​Break
​3-5 p.m.
​Participants may continue slavery and abolition research in the Library of Congress.
​6:30-9 p.m.
​Participants may do research at the Library of Congress using the Second Street, SE, Entrance for Researchers.
Wednesday’s Reading:
Selection from Kate Masur’s An Example for All the Land: Emancipation and the Struggle over Equality in Washington, D.C., in the Slavery & Constitution Reader [Chapter 1 “Everywhere Freedom & Everybody Free” 13-50; Chapter 5 “Make Haste Slowly: The Limits of Equality” 151-208]

Thursday, July 19 – National Museum of African American History and Culture
9-10:15 a.m.
Spencer Crew, professor of history, George Mason University, 
will open a discussion on the daily lives of slaves.
​10:15-10:30 a.m.
Break
​10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
​Dr. Crew will focus the discussion on how the Constitution was used to keep slaves enslaved.
1:30 p.m.
​Depart by Metro for the National Museum of African American History and Culture
​2-4:30 p.m.
​Dr. Crew will give a tour of the museum’s exhibits dealing with slavery and abolition.
​6:30-9 p.m.
​Participants may do research at the Library of Congress using the Second Street, SE, Entrance for Researchers.
​Thursday’s Reading: 
Crew, Spencer and Cindy Goodman. Unchained Memories: Readings from the Slave Narratives in the Slavery & Constitution Reader [Chapter 1 “Slave Auctions” 31-35; Chapter 2 “Works” 36-54; Chapter 4 “Living Conditions” 67-86; Chapter 5 “Abuse” 87-102] 

Friday, July 20 – Constitutional Crisis Over Slavery
9-10:15 a.m.
Dr. Finkelman will analyze and summarize many of the key insights that have been revealed during the institute and open a final discussion about what new interpretations have been gained.
​10:15-10:30 a.m.
Break
​10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
​Dr. Finkelman will continue this final discussion.
​12-1:30 p.m.
​Lunch on your own
​1:30-4:30 p.m.
Steven Livengood, chief guide for the U.S. Capitol Historical Society, will lead a tour of the U.S. Capitol and demonstrate the contributions of slaves and freemen to the building of the U.S. Capitol.
Friday's Reading:
Selections from Lawrence Goldstone’s Dark Bargain: Slavery, Profits, and the Struggle for the Constitution in the Slavery & Constitution Reader [Part III “Supreme Law of the Land” 93-196] 

Saturday, July 21 – Sharing New Insights
9-12 p.m.
Wrap-up session with participants sharing new insights gained from their research in the Library of Congress
​12-1:30 p.m.
​Lunch on your own
​1:30-5 p.m.
​Participants may conclude slavery and constitutional research in the Library of Congress.